Surviving from unprecedented floods in Bangladesh

New

Between June and August 2020, the worst and most prolonged monsoon-related floods in decades devastated the lives of millions of people in South and East Asia. Bangladesh, which was still recovering from the effects of super-cyclone Amphan and struggling to contain the COVID-19 pandemic, was severely impacted. Around 40% of the country - a delta-nation crisscrossed by hundreds of rivers – was submerged. Hundreds of people were killed, over 1 million households flooded and nearly 130,000 hectares of cropland were heavily damaged. We’re supporting BRAC to provide emergency humanitarian aid to over 50,000 displaced families in seven severely impacted districts.

Duration
2020-2021
Focus area
Emergency Response
country
Bangladesh
partner
BRAC

Context

Between June and August 2020, Bangladesh battled its worst and longest monsoon flooding in years. About 40% of the country - a delta-nation crisscrossed by hundreds of rivers – was submerged. Hundreds of people were killed, over 1 million households flooded and nearly 130,000 hectares of cropland heavily damaged.

When the torrential rains started, the South Asian nation was still recovering from the devastation caused by Cyclone Amphan - considered Bangladesh’s most intense cyclone in two decades - and struggling to contain the coronavirus pandemic.

Emergency response

Nearly 5 million people lost their homes, livelihoods and land in just a few weeks.

Immediately after the deadly floods hit the country, BRAC stepped forward to provide food assistance, oral rehydration products, hygiene kits and essential health items to over 50,000 displaced families. The organisation also started building toilet facilities in temporary shelter centres which soon became overcrowded.

We’re contributing to BRAC’s emergency response and recovery plan to provide ongoing humanitarian assistance in the months to come to meet the displaced populations’ basic needs and contain the spread of COVID-19 in temporary shelters.

As the flood waters recede and people slowly return to their homes, BRAC is planning to provide early recovery support in the form of cash assistance to repair damaged houses and to purchase safe water supply and adequate sanitation facilities.

The flooding of farmlands and destruction of crops could push millions of people who are already badly impacted by COVID-19 further into poverty. BRAC will, therefore, also be providing agricultural inputs such as seeds, fertilizers, tools and equipment as well as livestock to support poor farmers in their livelihood recovery.

The National Disaster Response Coordination Centre reported that the total damage and loss caused by the prolonged flooding amounts to almost US$ 704.67 million