Making health services sustainable in Cox’s Bazar

Completed

As the reality of a protracted crisis settled over the Cox’s Bazar refugee camps, we supported BRAC, one of the largest civil society organisations in place, to refurbish and renovate one primary health centre and two health posts, improving access to quality lifesaving health services and serving over 140,000 refugees between April 2019 and February 2020.

Duration
2018-2020
Focus area
Emergency Response
country
Bangladesh
partner
BRAC

Results achieved

Escalating violence in Myanmar’s Rakhine State has driven more than 700,000 Rohingya refugees across the border into the Cox’s Bazar area of south-eastern Bangladesh since August 2017. Mostly traumatised women and children, they have found shelter in refugee camps where access to basic services such as food and healthcare continues to be precarious, while compounding risks and vulnerabilities still threaten their safety and well-being.

BRAC has been present in Cox’s Bazar for 35 years and has the largest civil society response for the Rohingya refugees and host communities in place, with a team of 3,800 people, including over 1,600 from the host community and 1,460 from the Rohingya community.

BRAC provides critical services such as water, sanitation, healthcare, financial inclusion and child protection (more than 5,500 households are led by a child).

As the reality of a protracted crisis settled over the camps, we supported BRAC to refurbish and renovate one primary health centre and two health posts, improving access to quality lifesaving health services with a focus on sexual and reproductive health, maternal, neonatal, child and adolescent health, non-communicable diseases and mental health. Upgraded infrastructures represent hard-won progress in an extremely fragile and precarious situation.

Between April 2019 and February 2020, BRAC teams provided quality health services to over 140,000 refugees, including 334,000 medical consultations, 2,300 safe deliveries and 14,000 family planning visits. BRAC medical teams had to cope with a growing number of critical measles and cholera cases needing intensive care.