Cartier Philanthropy - Educating micro-entrepreneurs, investing in livelihoods

Educating micro-entrepreneurs, investing in livelihoods

Completed

Although informal micro-businesses provide the main source of income for most of the non-agricultural population of Madagascar, micro-entrepreneurs often lack the managerial skills and medium-term vision to ensure their businesses survive for more than a year. IECD in partnership with the local NGO Madagascar Enterprise Development provided 320 start-up entrepreneurs and small business owners with basic management training and mentoring, thereby empowering them to strengthen their businesses, making them more profitable and sustainable. The training thus helped the entrepreneurs achieve more stable incomes and improved living conditions for their families and employees. In addition, 75 extremely vulnerable micro-entrepreneurs (street vendors and illiterate entrepreneurs) also learnt how to stabilise their incomes.

Duration
2017-2019
Focus area
Sustainable Livelihoods and Ecosystems
country
Madagascar
partner
IECD

Results achieved

In Madagascar, micro-enterprises operating in the arts and crafts, trade and local service sectors account for the great majority of non-agricultural informal employment. These businesses are frequently precarious and struggle to increase their productivity. Indeed, micro-entrepreneurs often lack the managerial skills and medium-term vision to ensure their businesses survive for more than a year.

For the past three yearsIECD in partnership with the local NGO Madagascar Enterprise Development (MED) provided basic management training and mentoring for 320 start-up entrepreneurs and small business owners in Antananarivo, empowering the participants to fully assess the feasibility of and strengthen their business ventures, making them more profitable and sustainable. The training – which extended from marketing and sales to finance and market analysis – helped the entrepreneurs achieve more stable incomes and improved living conditions for their families and employees.

In addition, 75 extremely vulnerable micro-entrepreneurs (street vendors and illiterate entrepreneurs) also learnt basic management principles that helped them stabilise their incomes.

Upon completion of their training, the micro-entrepreneurs joined the Entrepreneur Club, a way of maintaining links with the tutors and gaining access to learning resources that will help them further expand their knowledge.

We’re continuing to support IECD and MED for a further three years.